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Dwarf Blue Curled Scotch Kale

Botanical Name: Brassica oleracea

$3.95
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# of seeds per packet: 205

Description

55-60 days. As its name implies, this kale is a dwarf variety that provides an extended harvest of small & tender leaves—perfect for cut-and-come-again baby greens. Max height about 18". Grow as an edible ground cover under or around taller crops such as tomatoes, basil, chard and peppers. Very cold hardy. Harvest it in fall outside or with winter protection (hoophouse, low tunnel, or coldframe). Given winter protection, this kale will continue to produce until early June, providing fresh greens & kale raab during the spring "food gap!" Smaller leaves have tender, edible stems, lending versatility in the kitchen. Curly leaves are great for kale chips.

Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Kale tolerates cold weather so it can be started extra early. Start kale seeds indoors March 1st at 72-85° (can use a heating mat). Days to germination: 5-8. Transplant outside March 27th, 6” apart. Or, since Blue Curled Scotch is a dwarf kale and can be grown for baby kale or as a ground cover, broadcast sow seeds 2-3” apart directly outside anytime March 27th – Aug 1st. Keep seeds evenly moist until germination. Protect kale plants from deer, groundhogs, and rabbits which will devour them. Kale plants may be eaten by European Cabbageworm (which is the caterpillar of the small white butterfly that flits around the garden). If they cause significant damage, hand remove caterpillars or spray organic BT.

 

Harvest:

Baby Leaves, for cut-and-come-again: when leaves are 3-4”, cut entire plant with scissors 2" above soil level so you don’t damage the growing crown. Plants will re-grow so you can return for many harvests. Mature Kale: harvest individual leaves off of mature plants once they are 2 months old. Don’t remove more than 1/3 of the leaves at a time.  

 

Seed Saving Instructions (for gardeners):

Kale is somewhat difficult to save seed from. Kale plants must overwinter in order to bloom and produce seed. Sometimes kale plants will survive the winter with protection. Kale is in the Brassica family so it is insect pollinated and cross-pollinated. Kale will cross with any Brassica oleracea that are flowering at the same time (broccoli, collards, cabbage, brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, cauliflower). Isolation distance: ½ mile. It can suffer from inbreeding depression if you don’t save seeds from enough plants. Minimum population size: 10-50 plants. To harvest seed, allow plants to flower and collect seed from mature pods.

Tags: vegetable

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Dwarf Blue Curled Scotch Kale [[start tab]]

Description

55-60 days. As its name implies, this kale is a dwarf variety that provides an extended harvest of small & tender leaves—perfect for cut-and-come-again baby greens. Max height about 18". Grow as an edible ground cover under or around taller crops such as tomatoes, basil, chard and peppers. Very cold hardy. Harvest it in fall outside or with winter protection (hoophouse, low tunnel, or coldframe). Given winter protection, this kale will continue to produce until early June, providing fresh greens & kale raab during the spring "food gap!" Smaller leaves have tender, edible stems, lending versatility in the kitchen. Curly leaves are great for kale chips.

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Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Kale tolerates cold weather so it can be started extra early. Start kale seeds indoors March 1st at 72-85° (can use a heating mat). Days to germination: 5-8. Transplant outside March 27th, 6” apart. Or, since Blue Curled Scotch is a dwarf kale and can be grown for baby kale or as a ground cover, broadcast sow seeds 2-3” apart directly outside anytime March 27th – Aug 1st. Keep seeds evenly moist until germination. Protect kale plants from deer, groundhogs, and rabbits which will devour them. Kale plants may be eaten by European Cabbageworm (which is the caterpillar of the small white butterfly that flits around the garden). If they cause significant damage, hand remove caterpillars or spray organic BT.

 

Harvest:

Baby Leaves, for cut-and-come-again: when leaves are 3-4”, cut entire plant with scissors 2" above soil level so you don’t damage the growing crown. Plants will re-grow so you can return for many harvests. Mature Kale: harvest individual leaves off of mature plants once they are 2 months old. Don’t remove more than 1/3 of the leaves at a time.  

 

Seed Saving Instructions (for gardeners):

Kale is somewhat difficult to save seed from. Kale plants must overwinter in order to bloom and produce seed. Sometimes kale plants will survive the winter with protection. Kale is in the Brassica family so it is insect pollinated and cross-pollinated. Kale will cross with any Brassica oleracea that are flowering at the same time (broccoli, collards, cabbage, brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, cauliflower). Isolation distance: ½ mile. It can suffer from inbreeding depression if you don’t save seeds from enough plants. Minimum population size: 10-50 plants. To harvest seed, allow plants to flower and collect seed from mature pods.

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