Log-in
German Red Garlic

German Red Garlic

Botanical Name: Allium sativum

$10.00
- +

Size: 1/4 lb

Description

Rocambole type - For true garlic lovers, this light purple-skinned, hardneck rocambole-type is known for its robust, spicy flavor. German Red is well adapted to northern climates, and stores well. Hot and spicy at first and mellows quickly. Full of flavor but you won’t have that stale garlic taste in your mouth for hours afterwards even if eaten raw. Medium-sized cloves, 6–9 per head. This garlic is sustainably grown by our friend Tim Redmond at Skinny Farm of Scio Township, Michigan.

Due to shipping restrictions, garlic can only be shipped to the following states:

CT, DE, IL, IN, IA, KY, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MO, NH, NJ, NY, NC, OH, PN, RI, SC, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI, and Washington DC

Growing

 Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Garlic is planted in the fall, after the first light frost but before the ground freezes, usually in late October or November. Overwintering (exposure to cold) is essential for bulb development. Garlic is a heavy feeder, so plant in fertile, well-drained soil rich in organic matter and nutrients. Keep bulbs intact until you are ready to plant them, then break up into individual cloves leaving clove skins intact. Plant cloves about 2" deep into the soil, 6-8" apart in rows spaced 12" apart. The tapered end of the clove should point up, and the flatter end with the attachment point should point down. Covering the soil with a light layer of mulch (straw, oak leaves) helps suppress weeds, retain moisture, and fertilizes the soil. Do not remove the mulch in the spring. Cut or remove the weeds a few times in the spring and summer, as garlic does not compete well against weeds. Garlic will benefit from regular watering (at least 1" of water per week).

 Harvest:

Hardneck garlic will produce scapes which are edible flowering stems that develop in early summer. Break off the scapes and use as a vegetable. Harvest the bulbs when the lower 4-6 leaves of the garlic plants are yellow/brown (sometime in July), loosen the soil with a digging fork and carefully lift the bulb out of the soil. Brush off the dirt, then hang garlic or lay out on raised screens in well ventilated area away from sunlight, to cure for about 10-14 days. After during, trim roots off and cut stem to about 1" above bulb. Outer skin should be crispy dry, and cut stem should be hard. Garlic is best stored at 50-70°F and around 50% humidity.

 Seed Saving Instructions for gardeners:

Save the biggest bulbs for planting stock for next season. Keep bulbs cool and dark until ready to plant (but not in the fridge because this can make it sprout.) If scapes are not removed during growing, the scapes will form bulbils, which can be collected and planted like seeds. During the first growing season, planted bulbils will grow into single cloves, which can be dug up and re-planted to produce full bulbs the following year. In rare cases, scapes can produce "true" seed, which does not grow true to type.

German Red Garlic [[start tab]]

Description

Rocambole type - For true garlic lovers, this light purple-skinned, hardneck rocambole-type is known for its robust, spicy flavor. German Red is well adapted to northern climates, and stores well. Hot and spicy at first and mellows quickly. Full of flavor but you won’t have that stale garlic taste in your mouth for hours afterwards even if eaten raw. Medium-sized cloves, 6–9 per head. This garlic is sustainably grown by our friend Tim Redmond at Skinny Farm of Scio Township, Michigan.

Due to shipping restrictions, garlic can only be shipped to the following states:

CT, DE, IL, IN, IA, KY, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MO, NH, NJ, NY, NC, OH, PN, RI, SC, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI, and Washington DC

[[end tab]] [[start tab]]

Growing

 Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Garlic is planted in the fall, after the first light frost but before the ground freezes, usually in late October or November. Overwintering (exposure to cold) is essential for bulb development. Garlic is a heavy feeder, so plant in fertile, well-drained soil rich in organic matter and nutrients. Keep bulbs intact until you are ready to plant them, then break up into individual cloves leaving clove skins intact. Plant cloves about 2" deep into the soil, 6-8" apart in rows spaced 12" apart. The tapered end of the clove should point up, and the flatter end with the attachment point should point down. Covering the soil with a light layer of mulch (straw, oak leaves) helps suppress weeds, retain moisture, and fertilizes the soil. Do not remove the mulch in the spring. Cut or remove the weeds a few times in the spring and summer, as garlic does not compete well against weeds. Garlic will benefit from regular watering (at least 1" of water per week).

 Harvest:

Hardneck garlic will produce scapes which are edible flowering stems that develop in early summer. Break off the scapes and use as a vegetable. Harvest the bulbs when the lower 4-6 leaves of the garlic plants are yellow/brown (sometime in July), loosen the soil with a digging fork and carefully lift the bulb out of the soil. Brush off the dirt, then hang garlic or lay out on raised screens in well ventilated area away from sunlight, to cure for about 10-14 days. After during, trim roots off and cut stem to about 1" above bulb. Outer skin should be crispy dry, and cut stem should be hard. Garlic is best stored at 50-70°F and around 50% humidity.

 Seed Saving Instructions for gardeners:

Save the biggest bulbs for planting stock for next season. Keep bulbs cool and dark until ready to plant (but not in the fridge because this can make it sprout.) If scapes are not removed during growing, the scapes will form bulbils, which can be collected and planted like seeds. During the first growing season, planted bulbils will grow into single cloves, which can be dug up and re-planted to produce full bulbs the following year. In rare cases, scapes can produce "true" seed, which does not grow true to type.

[[end tab]]
$10.00 In Stock
Scroll to top