Log-in

Uncle Everett's Tomato

Botanical Name: Solanum lycopersicum

$3.95

Out of Stock - see date below

Would you like to be notified by email when Uncle Everett's Tomato becomes available?

Description

Out of Stock for 2017. Uncle Everett’s is a very large, pinkish red, beefsteak tomato with old fashioned, full tomato flavor.  For an older heirloom type tomato, the plants are vigorous and fairly disease resistant. We acquired seed from Greg and Mary Reynolds of Riverbend Farm, Delano, Minnesota. The seed originally came from Greg Njoes who got it from his uncle Everett who grew it near Guckeen, MN, until he quit gardening in his 90's. This tomato is versatile for cooking and fresh eating alike. Flavor is mildly tart. Fruit is juicy and the slices hold together well making them good for caprese salad. We are happy to be offering this Upper Midwest heirloom. Indeterminate. Seeds grown by Nature and Nurture Seeds.

Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA zone 5b):

Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost (around 4/1). Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Days to germination: 5-14. Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil (with lots of compost or decomposed manure) at a spacing of 18” apart. Stake tomato plants. Tomatoes are susceptible to several fungal diseases (including Early and Late Blight and Verticillium Wilt). To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses. Crop rotation is also key to preventing tomato diseases. Ideally, plant tomato plants in a spot that has not had any Solanaceae crops (tomato, peppers, eggplant, potatoes) growing there for 4 years. Frequent watering will help to minimize cracking of tomatoes.

Seed Stories

One of the most popular vegetables, the domestic tomato (Lycopericon esculentum) originated in what is now southern Mexico. In the early 1500s, Spanish conquistadores found it in this region, where the Aztecs called it “tomatl” (“swelling fruit”). Hernán Cortés brought the cultivated tomatoes back to Spain before it trickled into Italy, where plants were grown mainly as garden ornaments but not widely eaten, for they were often feared poisonous! British colonies and the United States did not start accepting tomatoes as food crops until the 19th century, when they began to be widely cultivated.  We acquired this seed from Greg and Mary Reynolds of Riverbend Farm in Delano, Minnesota. They received the seed from a friend who got it from Greg Njoes of Minneapolis, who named it after his uncle Everett Dybevick of Guckeen, Minnesota. We talked to Mr. Njoes, who told us that his uncle Everett found the tomato at a road-side market in western Wisconsin in the mid 1960s. His uncle loved the tomato so much that he saved the seeds and grew the tomato until he quit gardening at the age of 100. Mr. Dybevick called the tomato “Dyvie Deluxe”, but his family named it “Uncle Everett” after him. Greg. Mr Njoes continues to grow, save and share the seed. ning at 100.  Mr Dybevick called the to Njoes continues to grow, save and share the seed today.

Related products

Uncle Everett's Tomato

[[start tab]]

Description

Out of Stock for 2017. Uncle Everett’s is a very large, pinkish red, beefsteak tomato with old fashioned, full tomato flavor.  For an older heirloom type tomato, the plants are vigorous and fairly disease resistant. We acquired seed from Greg and Mary Reynolds of Riverbend Farm, Delano, Minnesota. The seed originally came from Greg Njoes who got it from his uncle Everett who grew it near Guckeen, MN, until he quit gardening in his 90's. This tomato is versatile for cooking and fresh eating alike. Flavor is mildly tart. Fruit is juicy and the slices hold together well making them good for caprese salad. We are happy to be offering this Upper Midwest heirloom. Indeterminate. Seeds grown by Nature and Nurture Seeds.

[[end tab]] [[start tab]]

Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA zone 5b):

Start tomato seeds inside at least 6 weeks before last frost (around 4/1). Ideal temperature for germination is 85°  (use a heating mat). Days to germination: 5-14. Once leaves appear, grow plants at 72°. Plant seedlings outside late May into fertile garden soil (with lots of compost or decomposed manure) at a spacing of 18” apart. Stake tomato plants. Tomatoes are susceptible to several fungal diseases (including Early and Late Blight and Verticillium Wilt). To prevent blight, keep foliage dry by 1) Pruning tomato plants to allow for good air circulation 2) Water with drip irrigation/soaker hoses. Crop rotation is also key to preventing tomato diseases. Ideally, plant tomato plants in a spot that has not had any Solanaceae crops (tomato, peppers, eggplant, potatoes) growing there for 4 years. Frequent watering will help to minimize cracking of tomatoes.

[[end tab]] [[start tab]]

Seed Stories

One of the most popular vegetables, the domestic tomato (Lycopericon esculentum) originated in what is now southern Mexico. In the early 1500s, Spanish conquistadores found it in this region, where the Aztecs called it “tomatl” (“swelling fruit”). Hernán Cortés brought the cultivated tomatoes back to Spain before it trickled into Italy, where plants were grown mainly as garden ornaments but not widely eaten, for they were often feared poisonous! British colonies and the United States did not start accepting tomatoes as food crops until the 19th century, when they began to be widely cultivated.  We acquired this seed from Greg and Mary Reynolds of Riverbend Farm in Delano, Minnesota. They received the seed from a friend who got it from Greg Njoes of Minneapolis, who named it after his uncle Everett Dybevick of Guckeen, Minnesota. We talked to Mr. Njoes, who told us that his uncle Everett found the tomato at a road-side market in western Wisconsin in the mid 1960s. His uncle loved the tomato so much that he saved the seeds and grew the tomato until he quit gardening at the age of 100. Mr. Dybevick called the tomato “Dyvie Deluxe”, but his family named it “Uncle Everett” after him. Greg. Mr Njoes continues to grow, save and share the seed. ning at 100.  Mr Dybevick called the to Njoes continues to grow, save and share the seed today.

[[end tab]]

$3.95 Out of Stock
Scroll to top