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Dakota Black Popcorn

Botanical Name: Zea mays

$4.25
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Description

100 days. This beautiful black-kerneled popcorn is easy to grow and tastes incredible. Erica’s mom, who is a serious popcorn aficionado, describes the rich flavor as “delicious!” and it is practically hearty enough to be a meal on its own. Plants are early, 6’ tall and produce 1, 6-8” ear per plant with kernels that are dark red/black and pop up bright white. Before popping, dry the ears inside until moisture level is 13-14% (usually 3-4 weeks). Use an inexpensive hand corn sheller to remove kernels from the cob and pop as you would normally or place a whole cob in a paper bag and put it in the microwave. Great served plain, with butter, or with “hippie butter” (olive oil, nutritional yeast, salt, and garlic)! Another great northern variety bred by the Podoll’s of Prairie Road Organic Seeds in North Dakota. Released under the Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI) to keep seeds unpatented and in the hands of the people for all times. We are all forever indebted to the indigenous people of central America who domesticated corn from its wild ancestor, Teosinte, to the incredibly diverse, yummy crop that it is today! 

Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Corn needs fertile soil with a lot of compost/manure. Corn is wind pollinated so you should grow at least 16 corn plants (plant in a block – not in a row) so that enough pollen from the tassels will land on the silks to pollinate all of the kernels to produce full ears of corn. Not enough space for 16 plants? You can hand pollinate your corn (look online for instructions). Plant corn seeds outside after the soil has warmed to at least 65° (5/20-6/15). Plant seeds 6” apart in rows 36” apart (thin plants to 12” apart). Plant at least 4 rows of 4 plants in a block. Days to germination: 3-12. You can also start corn seeds inside and transplant outside 5/20-6/15.

 Harvest:

Leave ears on plant until kernels are hard and glossy and the husk is tan and dry. Harvest on a dry day. Break off ears, remove husks and lay them out to dry for several weeks under cover in an area with good air circulation. Kernels should be 13-14% for best popping. Periodically test dryness by doing a test pop. Store on the cob or shelled. Kernels can be removed with a knife or an inexpensive hand sheller found online. For those so inclined, corn can be popped on the cob in a microwave.

 Seed Saving Instructions for gardeners:

Corn is a difficult seed saving crop. Corn suffers from inbreeding depression if seed is saved from too few plants. Minimum population size: 100 plants. Corn is cross pollinated and will cross with all other corn varieties. It is wind pollinated which can carry pollen for several miles so corn seed can be contaminated by GMO field corn. Isolate corn from other varieties by at least 2 miles. Harvest seed from the interior (as opposed to the outer rows) to help minimize crossing.

Dakota Black Popcorn [[start tab]]

Description

100 days. This beautiful black-kerneled popcorn is easy to grow and tastes incredible. Erica’s mom, who is a serious popcorn aficionado, describes the rich flavor as “delicious!” and it is practically hearty enough to be a meal on its own. Plants are early, 6’ tall and produce 1, 6-8” ear per plant with kernels that are dark red/black and pop up bright white. Before popping, dry the ears inside until moisture level is 13-14% (usually 3-4 weeks). Use an inexpensive hand corn sheller to remove kernels from the cob and pop as you would normally or place a whole cob in a paper bag and put it in the microwave. Great served plain, with butter, or with “hippie butter” (olive oil, nutritional yeast, salt, and garlic)! Another great northern variety bred by the Podoll’s of Prairie Road Organic Seeds in North Dakota. Released under the Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI) to keep seeds unpatented and in the hands of the people for all times. We are all forever indebted to the indigenous people of central America who domesticated corn from its wild ancestor, Teosinte, to the incredibly diverse, yummy crop that it is today! 

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Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Corn needs fertile soil with a lot of compost/manure. Corn is wind pollinated so you should grow at least 16 corn plants (plant in a block – not in a row) so that enough pollen from the tassels will land on the silks to pollinate all of the kernels to produce full ears of corn. Not enough space for 16 plants? You can hand pollinate your corn (look online for instructions). Plant corn seeds outside after the soil has warmed to at least 65° (5/20-6/15). Plant seeds 6” apart in rows 36” apart (thin plants to 12” apart). Plant at least 4 rows of 4 plants in a block. Days to germination: 3-12. You can also start corn seeds inside and transplant outside 5/20-6/15.

 Harvest:

Leave ears on plant until kernels are hard and glossy and the husk is tan and dry. Harvest on a dry day. Break off ears, remove husks and lay them out to dry for several weeks under cover in an area with good air circulation. Kernels should be 13-14% for best popping. Periodically test dryness by doing a test pop. Store on the cob or shelled. Kernels can be removed with a knife or an inexpensive hand sheller found online. For those so inclined, corn can be popped on the cob in a microwave.

 Seed Saving Instructions for gardeners:

Corn is a difficult seed saving crop. Corn suffers from inbreeding depression if seed is saved from too few plants. Minimum population size: 100 plants. Corn is cross pollinated and will cross with all other corn varieties. It is wind pollinated which can carry pollen for several miles so corn seed can be contaminated by GMO field corn. Isolate corn from other varieties by at least 2 miles. Harvest seed from the interior (as opposed to the outer rows) to help minimize crossing.

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$4.25 In Stock
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