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Genovese Basil

Botanical Name: Ocimum basilicum

$3.95
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# of seeds per packet: 240

Description

68 days. Traditional Italian basil used for classic pesto. Fabulous, highly fragrant, sweet, pure "basil" flavor. Compact plants produce lots of leaves for harvest. The name comes from the Italian word "Genoese" (or that which comes from the region of Genoa) where Genovese Basil is still grown today. Genovese is very versatile in the kitchen—use it in salads, Italian dishes, stir-fries, soups and more. Erica loves it in her "Summer Salad" with tomatoes, cucumbers, olive oil, and ume plum vinegar. Can be preserved by packing in salt, which creates incredible "basil salt" (see Recipes tab).

Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Basil is a full sun, heat loving crop. It will become bitter if it is allowed to bolt (flower) or if exposed to temps below 50°. Start seeds indoors April 10th - May 1st at a temp of 75° (use heating mat). Days to germination: 5-14. Do not let plants become potbound (too big for their pots) because this will stunt plants. Transplant outside, 10” apart, after nighttime temps are above 50°. Alternatively, sow seeds directly outside early June. Prune young plants to encourage side branching. For an extended harvest, consider starting a 2nd planting May 15th.

 

Harvest:

Clip stems (with leaves attached) back several inches – do not clip off more than 1/2 of the plant at one time. Frequently clip (harvest) plants to keep them from bolting. Leaves are removed from stems in the kitchen.

 

Seed Saving Instructions (for gardeners):

Basil seeds need a long, hot growing season so it is somewhat difficult to save seeds here in Southeast MI. Seeds should be left on the plant until they are mature (black). Cut and dry stems in paper bags. Basil plants are insect pollinated and may cross pollinate with other basil varieties. Isolation distance: 150’ should be adequate. Clean seed as a dry seeded crop.

Seed Stories

There are more than 60 different varieties of basil (Osicum basilicum), which belongs to the mint plant family Lamiaceae. Genovese basil is a cultivated variety of sweet basil, which originated in India and Persia. Genovese is the traditional Italian basil used for classic pesto. The name comes from the Italian word “Genoese”, meaning originating from the region of Genoa, Italy where it is still grown today. Community Farm of Ann Arbor has been marketing their excellent pesto from Genovese basil for many years.

Genovese Basil [[start tab]]

Description

68 days. Traditional Italian basil used for classic pesto. Fabulous, highly fragrant, sweet, pure "basil" flavor. Compact plants produce lots of leaves for harvest. The name comes from the Italian word "Genoese" (or that which comes from the region of Genoa) where Genovese Basil is still grown today. Genovese is very versatile in the kitchen—use it in salads, Italian dishes, stir-fries, soups and more. Erica loves it in her "Summer Salad" with tomatoes, cucumbers, olive oil, and ume plum vinegar. Can be preserved by packing in salt, which creates incredible "basil salt" (see Recipes tab).

[[end tab]] [[start tab]]

Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Basil is a full sun, heat loving crop. It will become bitter if it is allowed to bolt (flower) or if exposed to temps below 50°. Start seeds indoors April 10th - May 1st at a temp of 75° (use heating mat). Days to germination: 5-14. Do not let plants become potbound (too big for their pots) because this will stunt plants. Transplant outside, 10” apart, after nighttime temps are above 50°. Alternatively, sow seeds directly outside early June. Prune young plants to encourage side branching. For an extended harvest, consider starting a 2nd planting May 15th.

 

Harvest:

Clip stems (with leaves attached) back several inches – do not clip off more than 1/2 of the plant at one time. Frequently clip (harvest) plants to keep them from bolting. Leaves are removed from stems in the kitchen.

 

Seed Saving Instructions (for gardeners):

Basil seeds need a long, hot growing season so it is somewhat difficult to save seeds here in Southeast MI. Seeds should be left on the plant until they are mature (black). Cut and dry stems in paper bags. Basil plants are insect pollinated and may cross pollinate with other basil varieties. Isolation distance: 150’ should be adequate. Clean seed as a dry seeded crop.

[[end tab]] [[start tab]]

Seed Stories

There are more than 60 different varieties of basil (Osicum basilicum), which belongs to the mint plant family Lamiaceae. Genovese basil is a cultivated variety of sweet basil, which originated in India and Persia. Genovese is the traditional Italian basil used for classic pesto. The name comes from the Italian word “Genoese”, meaning originating from the region of Genoa, Italy where it is still grown today. Community Farm of Ann Arbor has been marketing their excellent pesto from Genovese basil for many years.

[[end tab]]
$3.95 In Stock
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