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Pride of Wisconsin Melon

Pride of Wisconsin Melon

Botanical Name: Cucumis melo

$3.95
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# of seeds per packet: 25

Description

90 days. Refreshingly sweet and juicy cantaloupe-type melon with a musky, fruity aroma. Flesh slices like butter, soft enough for easy spoon eating and firm enough to slice for salad. Medium-sized melons have a small seed cavity which means more flesh! Ripens apricot orange with netting on the rind. Good resistance to Downy Mildew. This melon was created by a cross of two of the most popular melons during the 1920’s and 1930’s in the upper Midwest. It was then introduced under the name “Pride of Wisconsin” by the Robert Buist Seed Company in 1937. There is some natural variability in shape, size, and netting of this variety. We love this melon for its reliability, high yield, and flavor. .

Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Soil: melons want lots of organic matter (compost and/or decomposed manure). Melons do not like their roots disturbed during transplanting. Start seeds indoors in small biodegradable pots 5/1. Ideal temperature for germination: 85-95° (use heating mat). Melon seedlings are sensitive to damping off fungus so keep seeds on the drier side and use a fan (set to low) to provide air circulation. Days to germination: 4-5. Once 2 leaves appear, grow plants at 72°.  Do not let plant become pot-bound in their pots. Transplant them outdoors, pot & all, around 6/1. Or, direct sow seeds outdoors (1/2” deep) around 6/1, keeping seeds moist until germination. Protect germinating seeds from slugs (use phosphate organic slug bait). Protect plants from cucumber beetles by covering seeds/seedlings with row cover fabric at planting. Protect plants from groundhogs and deer. Water plants regularly (we recommend drip irrigation/soaker hoses).

Harvest:

 When melons turn from green to orange and are easily removed from the plant.

Seed Saving Instructions (for gardeners):

  Melons are insect pollinated and will cross with all other melon  varieties (except watermelons) within ½ mile (or let the melon varieties cross and see what you get!). Minimum population size: 6-25 plants (but you can save seed from less # of plants if the seeds are for your own use). Always select seeds from the best plants. Rinse and dry seeds from ripe melons.

Seed Stories

Melons (Cucumis melo) are in the cucumber (Cucurbitaceae) family, originating in the Middle East but spreading to most parts of Europe and Asia in ancient times. Melons were one of the first old world plants brought to America and they were quickly adopted by many Native American tribes, several of which developed their own distinct varieties derived from those brought by the Spanish. Although muskmelons are often referred to as cantaloupes, that name more properly refers to European orange-fleshed non-netted melons that are rare in the US.

This melon was the result of a cross between two of the most popular melons (Honey Rock and Hearts of Gold) in the upper Midwest in the 1920’s and 1930’s. It was then introduced under the name “Pride of Wisconsin” by the Robert Buist Seed Company in 1937. It was also used as breeding stock in the breeding of other melons including Queen of Colorado, Market King, Healy’s Pride, and Pride of Fordhook. It is found to have good resistance to Downy Mildew by Twin Oaks farm in their muskmelons trials of 2013.

Tags: Wisconsin
Pride of Wisconsin Melon [[start tab]]

Description

90 days. Refreshingly sweet and juicy cantaloupe-type melon with a musky, fruity aroma. Flesh slices like butter, soft enough for easy spoon eating and firm enough to slice for salad. Medium-sized melons have a small seed cavity which means more flesh! Ripens apricot orange with netting on the rind. Good resistance to Downy Mildew. This melon was created by a cross of two of the most popular melons during the 1920’s and 1930’s in the upper Midwest. It was then introduced under the name “Pride of Wisconsin” by the Robert Buist Seed Company in 1937. There is some natural variability in shape, size, and netting of this variety. We love this melon for its reliability, high yield, and flavor. .

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Growing

Growing Instructions (for USDA Zone 5b):

Soil: melons want lots of organic matter (compost and/or decomposed manure). Melons do not like their roots disturbed during transplanting. Start seeds indoors in small biodegradable pots 5/1. Ideal temperature for germination: 85-95° (use heating mat). Melon seedlings are sensitive to damping off fungus so keep seeds on the drier side and use a fan (set to low) to provide air circulation. Days to germination: 4-5. Once 2 leaves appear, grow plants at 72°.  Do not let plant become pot-bound in their pots. Transplant them outdoors, pot & all, around 6/1. Or, direct sow seeds outdoors (1/2” deep) around 6/1, keeping seeds moist until germination. Protect germinating seeds from slugs (use phosphate organic slug bait). Protect plants from cucumber beetles by covering seeds/seedlings with row cover fabric at planting. Protect plants from groundhogs and deer. Water plants regularly (we recommend drip irrigation/soaker hoses).

Harvest:

 When melons turn from green to orange and are easily removed from the plant.

Seed Saving Instructions (for gardeners):

  Melons are insect pollinated and will cross with all other melon  varieties (except watermelons) within ½ mile (or let the melon varieties cross and see what you get!). Minimum population size: 6-25 plants (but you can save seed from less # of plants if the seeds are for your own use). Always select seeds from the best plants. Rinse and dry seeds from ripe melons.

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Seed Stories

Melons (Cucumis melo) are in the cucumber (Cucurbitaceae) family, originating in the Middle East but spreading to most parts of Europe and Asia in ancient times. Melons were one of the first old world plants brought to America and they were quickly adopted by many Native American tribes, several of which developed their own distinct varieties derived from those brought by the Spanish. Although muskmelons are often referred to as cantaloupes, that name more properly refers to European orange-fleshed non-netted melons that are rare in the US.

This melon was the result of a cross between two of the most popular melons (Honey Rock and Hearts of Gold) in the upper Midwest in the 1920’s and 1930’s. It was then introduced under the name “Pride of Wisconsin” by the Robert Buist Seed Company in 1937. It was also used as breeding stock in the breeding of other melons including Queen of Colorado, Market King, Healy’s Pride, and Pride of Fordhook. It is found to have good resistance to Downy Mildew by Twin Oaks farm in their muskmelons trials of 2013.

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$3.95 In Stock
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